Lake Kariba

Lake Kariba is the world’s largest man-made lake and reservoir by volume. It lies approximately 1 300 kilometers upstream from the Indian Ocean, along the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. The lake was filled following the completion of the Kariba Dam wall at its northeastern end, flooding the Kariba Gorge on the Zambezi River. The town of Kariba was built for construction workers on the lake’s dam in the late 1950’s.

Wildlife at Lake Kariba

One notable aspect of the lake is its diverse wildlife. The lake and its surrounding shores are home to a variety of bird species, including fish eagles and cormorants. These majestic birds can often be seen soaring through the skies or perched along the shorelines, hunting for fish. In addition to the birdlife, Lake Kariba attracts large numbers of elephants and other big game species. The presence of water draws these animals to the lake’s shores, providing them with a vital source of hydration in the arid landscape. It is a truly remarkable sight to witness herds of elephants gathering near the water’s edge or bathing in the shallows of the lake.

Things To Do at Lake Kariba

Experience the untamed beauty of Lake Kariba through a range of activities. Set sail on the pristine waters of this colossal man-made lake, where boat safaris offer breathtaking sunsets and wildlife encounters along the shoreline. Explore the terrain on game drives, encountering Africa’s Big Five and an array of other creatures. Enter the wilderness on guided walking safaris, forging a deep connection with nature as you soak in the sounds and scents of the bushveld. Birdwatchers will be in paradise, as Lake Kariba is home to a diverse avian population. Dive into local culture with visits to nearby villages, and try your hand at fishing, aiming for the legendary tigerfish. Lake Kariba offers the ultimate African adventure for all nature enthusiasts.

Kariba Dam hydroelectric power station

Today, the Kariba Dam hydroelectric power station, situated on the lake, serves as a vital source of electricity for both Zimbabwe and Zambia. The dam harnesses the power of the Zambezi River, generating substantial amounts of electricity that contribute to the energy needs of the two countries. This hydroelectric power station has become a significant cornerstone of the region’s power infrastructure, supporting economic development and improving the quality of life for local communities.

Crowned Eagle Boutique Hotel

Contact the reservations team at Hideaways to plan your Lake Kariba safari. Explore the waters and island of Lake Kariba, one of the largest man-made lakes in the world, where you can witness breathtaking sunsets and observe the wildlife that thrives along the lake’s shoreline.

For the perfect base to explore this magnificent wilderness, we invite you to stay at the luxurious Crowned Eagle Boutique Hotel.

Reservations:
Emailinfo@hideawaysafrica.com
Talk To Us: +27 (0) 21 671 7729

Plan Your Safari

Get in touch with our dedicated reservations department, where our consultants are eager to assist you in selecting the ideal destination and lodge that perfectly aligns with your preferences.  Let our experts guide you through the exciting possibilities and help you craft a trip that will create lasting memories.

Explore More Destinations

Best of Hwange safari lodges Victoria Falls Zimbabwe

Livingstone

Nestled in Zambia, the captivating town of Livingstone was established in 1905 by the famed explorer David Livingstone. This charming destination is a treasure trove

Matobo Hills Zimbabwe rhino tracking safari

Matopos

Matopos, also known as Matopo Hills, is an area located in Matobo National Park, South East Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, characterized by a striking assemblage of granite

Matobo Hills Rock Art Zimbabwe

Matobo National Park

One of Zimbabwe’s smaller reserves, Matobo National Park is located close to Bulawayo and forms the core of the famed Matopos. The spectacular landscape of

Lake Kariba Dam

Lake Kariba

Lake Kariba is the world’s largest man-made lake and reservoir by volume. It lies approximately 1 300 kilometers upstream from the Indian Ocean, along the